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Output Brooklyn Closing at the End of 2018

Output, a beacon for house and techno that helped turn a once sleepy stretch of Williamsburg, Brooklyn into an international nightlife destination, will close at the end of the year, the club’s owners announced today.

“A confluence of factors contributed to the club’s misfortune,” founders Nicolas Matar, Bo Pittman, and Shawn Schwartz announced on Facebook, without going into specifics. “Rapidly shifting social trends, unfavorable market conditions and weakening financial outlooks coincided with the simultaneous emergence of multiple existential challenges unique to the club’s circumstances.”

While acknowledging that the closing, which will occur after one last New Year’s Eve party, “may seem shocking to many,” the owners said they’ve “seen the writing on the wall for some time,” and rejected the option of “taking great risks on uncertain outcomes just to keep the club open in some diminished capacity.”

When the club opened in 2013, it flew in the face of snobby lounges that focused on bottle service, and harkened back to the big-box clubbing days of Limelight and the Palladium, complete with a tooth-rattling Funktion-One sound system. As New York put it in its Best of New York issue that year, “The point here is to dance, not just see and be seen.” Later, Grub Street declared it the absolute best club in New York.

Even as fancy hotels and their rooftop bars sprouted up around it, Output continued to draw an array of local legends like Danny Tenaglia (spinning Dec. 25) and Francois K (Dec. 26) as well as international stars like John Digweed, who will close out the venue on New Year’s Eve. In the summer, its rooftop bar drew lines down the block.

Output’s single-story building at 74 Wythe Avenue sold for $7.4 millionin 2014. At the time, the building’s seller said the club would “continue normal operations as per a long-term lease that is in place.”

Insider’s Guide To Japanese Nightclubs / Nightlife in Tokyo

When you think of drinking in Japan, there are kitschy theme bars, salarymen staying up until the wee hours only to end up napping at train stations till it’s time to clock in and decades-old, hole-in-the-wall establishments serving sake and light beer, as seen on Netflix’s popular series Midnight Diner: Tokyo Stories. But it’s only been a couple of years since the Japanese government lifted some of its 25-year-old Footloose-style, no-dancing-after-midnight laws. That’s partially thanks to one of Tokyo’s oldest hip-hop advocates, Hideyuki Yukoi aka Zeebra, who, along with his group King Giddra, played an important role in the development of the underground Japanese hip-hop scene in the early Nineties. On a visit to Delhi for the third edition of the India Nightlife Convention and Awards (INCA), Yukoi discusses his role as a nightlife ambassador, the similarities between Japan and India’s nightscape and his country’s excellent vinyl revolution.

As nightlife ambassador of Tokyo’s Shibuya district, what is it that you actually do?

I set up meetings between the government and the club owners, party organisers and nightlife representatives to come up with ideas to enhance the industry. Right now, we’re focused on amending restrictions on the size and area of clubs. I also represent the club and club culture conference in Tokyo, a platform that brings the city’s artists and DJ community together.

How did this role come about?

It happened when Mirik Milan (former Night Mayor of Amsterdam) and the (actual) mayor of Amsterdam invited us to be a part of the Night Mayor Summit in Amsterdam. The tourism board of Shibuya district then made me the official Nightlife Ambassador. We’re now working to expand the Night Mayor system to other Japanese cities.

Have you experienced India’s nightlife?

India and Japan are quite similar. Both countries have suffered from a heavily licenced nightlife, which resulted in a certain stunting of the industry. Japan’s strictest laws have been lifted now, but there are others that continue to exist.

So, what is the nightlife like in Tokyo?

It’s growing, for sure. Since the laws have relaxed, there’s been a spike in private investors and sponsors. Shibuya’s seen a massive change, and we want it to be a blueprint for other parts of the country.

What kind of music is popular?

It usually depends on the city. Roppongi sees a lot of tourists, so clubs there play a lot of EDM. House and techno music are coming back in a big way. There’s also a sort of vinyl revolution taking place, with musicians and artists from all over the world coming to Shibuya to browse and shop for prized and rare LPs.

What about drinks?

Whisky and soda is the preferred drink for most. Shochu is loved by all – it can be mixed with juice, green tea, soda, anything! Sake’s popular, but it’s only served in restaurants and bars. And, of course, tequila.

Where do you recommend partying?

In Shibuya, Vision, Bloody Angle and AgeHa – one of the largest clubs in Tokyo. Contact plays amazing house; go to Harlem or 1 OAK Tokyo for hip-hop, Womb for electronic music. The Shimokitazawa district is known for its indie bars, restaurants and performance venues.

Zeebra’s top spots to dance the night away in Osaka and Kyoto

Zeebra

Osaka
Ghost, Giraffe, Xex WEST

Don’t forget to stroll in and around Nihonbashi but enter love hotels and video game arcades at your own risk – this is where Black Mirror episodes come to life. Also make friends with the fun barkeeps at Takotako King.

Kyoto
Butterfly, World, Club Metro

Kyoto’s charm lies in its many bylanes, chock-a-block with bars the size of small living rooms. Jazz bars are extremely popular, like Hello Dolly.

Best EDM (Electronic Dance) Clubs in Miami

Miami’s known for nightlife, so it’s no surprise that they have some of the best EDM clubs in the country that are open til the sun comes up! Whether you’re into big room house, underground techno, progressive house, deep house, dubstep, or trap, you’ll be sure to find a venue that suits your taste in this nocturnal neon city. Check out the Discotech app to view event calendars, sign up for free guestlists, buy tickets, and reserve tables. Here are some of the best dance clubs in Miami for your nightlife bucketlist: 

Club Space

Located in downtown Miami, 16-year old Club Space is an afterhours institution that’s open 24/7 on weekends. The multi-room club has an infamous terrace for those who want to welcome the sunrise with a bang! No dresscode, no judgment, and no last call! Now that’s a recipe for a rager.

Do Not Sit on the Furniture

Owned by DJ Behrouz and intimately referred to as Do Not Sit by the regulars, this forward-thinking South Beach gem is perfect for deep house and techno lovers who appreciate low-key venues focused on the music.

E11even

Part lounge, part restaurant, part strip club, part mega club…E11even truly has it all! Come here if you want to experience a glamorous night of people-watching and bottle popping with aerial dancers to boot….just remember: No pics allowed! What happens at E11even stays at E11even.

Heart

Another 24-hour option in downtown Miami, Heart is a multi-level, multi-genre playing afterhours spot boasting a spankin’ new Funktion One sound system. The wide open dancefloor is uninterrupted by VIP tables, so you know what their priorities are!

Liv

One of the most upscale clubs in South Beach, Liv attracts celebrities and big name DJs on the regular. Since it’s located at the Fontainebleau hotel, you could technically stay on the premises all weekend and experience the best of Miami 24/7! Come here if you want to splurge on VIP experiences and get LIT!

Nikki Beach

Infamous enough to have satellite operations across exotic international locations (Ibiza, Bali, Dubai, Saint Tropez, etc.), Nikki Beach is an indoor/outdoor danceclub+ seafood restaurant with one of the most fabulous Sunday brunch buffets in Miami! This isn’t your average brunch – think: DJs, live music, Go-go dancers, and an all around cool, energetic vibe that transports you to Ibiza!

Story

Boasting one of the best sound systems and interiors of any club in the country, Story appeals to fans across all EDM genres, depending on the night. Fridays are generally for the big festival headliners, like Tiesto, while Saturdays are reserved for cutting edge underground acts, like Chris Liebing. Take your pick, though we recommend trying both! This high-end club never gets it wrong.

Trade

Located in the heart of South Beach on Collins Avenue, Trade’s jungle vibes and eclectic lineup will surely get you in the groove any given night. Distinct from many of the glitzy clubs in SoBe, Trade appeals to guests who are there for the music and want to skip the velvet rope rituals.

Treehouse

Kitschy, quirky, and cool, Treehouse is a triple threat. The atmosphere is dark and brooding with a slight nautical flair that makes you want to surf the sonic waves all night long.  While the main dancehall is urban-chic, the outdoor patio is a lush lounge that helps you understand their whimsical name. Treehouse offers the perfect balance between a club and a lounge, and boasts an eclectic, vibrant crowd that will keep you coming back for more.

There’s always new venues opening up in the Magic City, so make sure to check out the Discotech app for updates on the latest, greatest edm clubs in Miami!

Richie Hawtin Special Techno Set at Marquee Nightclub’s Boom Box Room Monday 11/28

To those who frequent Las Vegas and yearn for a more proper experience on the strip, your answer has come in the form of Richie Hawtin spinning at the Cosmopolitan’s Marquee Nightclub. The after-hours vibes will take place in the intimate boom box room on Monday 11/28/16, with an opening set from local talent BadBeat. This is an event that will amplify the vibes of the city’s Techno Taco Tuesday parties, and will undoubtedly grow the scene inches further into prominence in the party capitol of the world.

Best Electronic Dance (EDM) Clubs in San Francisco

Looking for the hottest clubs playing electronic dance music (EDM) in San Francisco? While the City by the Bay may not be known for its night life (yet), it’s a favorite stop for DJs, so there’s plenty of EDM shows to catch! Check out the Discotech app to view event calendars, sign up for free guestlists, buy tickets, and reserve tables. Here are some reliable electronic dance clubs in San Francisco to burn up the dancefloor any given weekend:

1015 Folsom

Bigger than you’d think once you get inside, 1015 Folsom is a bustling, multi-room ragefest where the crowd tends to be in their early-to-mid 20’s and the off-the-walls energy continues into the early morning. Not one to be predictable, 1015 features a diverse roster of DJs from Alesso to Duke Dumont to Trippy Turtle on any given night. Check out their calendar on the Discotech app to make sure you don’t miss your favorite act, and bring cash for the bar!

Audio

Upstairs from the craft cocktail lounge Bergerac, Audio SF is a trendy club that appeals to underground electronica fans and scenesters alike. Probably because their speakers and ambiance are world class. Not to mention the most amazing crepe truck in town next door that’s open til 4 in the mornin’!

Love and Propaganda

Run by the same people behind Audio, Love + Propaganda is the revamped ex-Vessel. The modern art decor is Instagram-worthy and the beats are bangin’. Make sure to bring ear plugs if you plan to be front and center on the dancefloor.

Halcyon

Recalling the Greek goddess of the same name, Halcyon is a fitting title for San Francisco’s freshest entry into its burgeoning house and techno clubbing scene.

Located next to fellow house haunt Audio SF—and around the corner from the city’s iconic Eagle club—Halcyon exists as a portal that transports revelers right to the revered black boxes that Ibiza used to be known for, with a laser-tight focus on delivering top-notch musical offerings and even greater vibes to its patrons. For many, the club provides the sort of clubbing experience that has yet to be offered in the Golden City, which historically has offered more low-key, intimate vibes than the show-stopping ones being served up in the new SOMA hotspot.

Thankfully, while Halcyon emulates the spirit of Ibiza megaclubs of yore, it does so without being addled with the uptight attitude and bottle-dominated economy that have plagued so many new clubs before it. Put simply: it delivers what made you fall in love with dance music the first time you heard it.

Upon arriving, guests are sure to be struck by the club’s easy-to-understand layout consisting of a single room, rather than the multi-environment labyrinths that had become the seeming standard in past years. The end result of this design choice? A uniform musical experience for all patrons, who don’t have to worry about how to find the bathrooms, who is playing in another room, or where their friends may be making out. At its end, clubbing is about making shared memories, and Halcyon is designed from the ground up in order to do so.

 

Monarch

Monarch is not for the meek.  You’ll notice that as soon as you roll up to their block. But that’s probably so they can weed out the imposters. The first act is the ground floor cocktail room that oozes boudoir Moulin Rouge vibes, acrobats and all. But for the second act, traverse downstairs to the dark, intimate basement where you’ll catch the kind of lineups you’d typically see in Berlin.

Public Works

Part-time club, part-time art gallery, Public Works is a wooden warehouse that draws Burners year-round to their Distrikt events. Bring cash, dress down, and grab a dirty dog on your way out!

Temple

If you like the showmanship and glamour of Las Vegas clubs, Temple SF is your spot. Girls in high heels and tight dresses with their hair and nails did get down to headliners like the Chainsmokers. The line to get in can be long, so plan accordingly. Temple also features a hip hop room downstairs – a little something for everyone!

The Great Northern

Brought to you by the owners of Monarch, the Great Northern is the renovated ex-Mighty! The lineup hasn’t changed much (read: John Digweed, Guy Gerber, etc.), but the interior has morphed into a cavernous art deco space featuring a custom designed Void sound system. We like what we see, but more importantly, we like what we hear! Check Great Northern out and let us know what you think.

Verso

Verso is chic and spacious. Whether you want to get lost in techno tunes or mingle at your own private booth, Verso has it all. Not to mention the gorgeous cocktail lounge next door, Forgery, if you want to start your night out on an upscale note.

Ruby Skye (Now Closed)

Ah, Ruby Skye – it’s an SF dance club institution at this point. Don’t be fooled by the exquisite crown molding in this converted theater – Ruby RAVES. Wear your trance pants and see DJs like Ilan Bluestone and Cosmic Gate here, among other more mainstream, big-room acts. Look out for those laser beams!

Make sure to check out the ever-growing list of electronic dance clubs in San Francisco on Discotech… another night out, another dancefloor!