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Bill Extending Nightlife in San Francisco, Oakland Passes Through Assembly

The California Assembly approved a bill Wednesday sponsored by State Senator Scott Wiener allowing certain cities to extend alcohol sales at bars, nightclubs and restaurants to 4 a.m.

Wiener tweeted that the passage of his bill is “a huge step forward.”

Nine cities are part of the 5-year pilot program, including San Francisco, Oakland and Los Angeles.

The bill allows, but does not require the cities to extend hours for alcohol sales. The bill passed the Assembly with a vote of 46-14 and now heads to the Senate for a vote. If it passes there, it will go to Governor Jerry Brown for his approval.

Opponents say the bill would add new costs and lead to more dangerous roads.
Similar bills have been introduced and killed several times since 2004.

August Hall & Fifth Arrow Replaces Ruby Skye & Slide

Ruby Skye, the turn-of-the-millennium club at 420 Mason St., and its companion bar, Slide — both of which closed earlier this year, will shortly become two new venues, August Hall and Fifth Arrow.

A project by Live Nation Entertainment and locals Nate Valentine, Scott Murphy, Justin Roja, and Chad Donnelly, August Hall will be a “live music and special event venue,” while Fifth Arrow is set to be come a “cocktail, dining, and gaming parlor with three bowling lanes. In other words, something terrible went away and something potentially really cool will replace it. Isn’t that refreshing?

Stacked on top of each other near Union Square — inside the circa-1890 Native Sons of the Golden West Building, which has housed theaters and clubs going back to the Second World War — the two will open in the spring. August Hall is named for architect August Headman, and the combination of 19th-century grandeur with 21st-century tech savvy will be able to accommodate upward of 750 guests for concerts plus up to 1,000 guests for dance events. All signs point to bottle service, although there will be three bars plus food.

Meanwhile, Fifth Arrow — a former speakeasy from the 1930s — takes its name from a “popular target point used by bowling aficionados for optimal scoring.” The team behind it has experience at numerous S.F. venues, such as Mamacita, The Tipsy Pig, Harper & Rye, Rambler at the Hotel Zeppelin) as well as event-production (Deckstar, Eventbrite) and music festivals (Snowglobe). Current renderings of the space appear dark and a little moody, evoking a classical atmosphere with a bit of mystery.

Temple Nightclub Denver Opening this Fall

San Francisco is home to one of the coolest nightclubs in the country: Temple. From the outside, it’s a rather unassuming place, but step inside and you’re transported to another dimension. The room gets its vibe from thousands of spherical lights protruding from the array of columns on the floor as well as the ceiling, making you feel like you’re in an actual space ship.

Now, Temple Nightclub will be arriving in Denver as part of the Zen Compound. The new compound will go live this fall in the old City Hall Event Venue at 1136 N. Broadway Street in Denver’s Capitol Hill and Golden Triangle Creative district. The nightclub will create a whole new nightlife experience, offering a 21 and over, fully immersive awe-inspiring lighting & visual experience, paired with world-class talent.

The new 20,000-square foot, three-story Zen Compound will open in stages with Temple Nightclub as the first concept to go live this fall. All three remaining concepts are expected to be up and running by the 2018 New Year.

“We see Denver as a sister city to San Francisco in many ways,” said San Francisco artist/DJ/entrepreneur Paul Hemming of his company’s expansion plan. “The Mile-High City is a major metropolitan hub and has an eclectic confluence of technology, music, art, entertainment and nightlife. It’s an exploding market with refined tastes, an entrepreneurial spirit and drive. Denver has a highly affluent market with appreciation for creativity and attention to detail.”

In Denver, construction is already underway and will bring 100 new jobs to residents; 80 of those positions are to be slotted for the nightclub. Hemming will lead design and oversee the architectural team and initial buildout, which calls for an aesthetic of “futuristic escapism” and theatrical elements while preserving key elements of the original structure. He’s also sole proprietor with a remarkable 20-year lease of the building.

Temple in SF brings hundreds of high quality DJs a year to its stage and we can expect the same from the upcoming Denver iteration.

“We found the perfect space and were able to assemble a great team and it all came together,” said Hemming.

So, stay tuned for more information about this new nightclub as it nears opening day and get excited, Colorado! This is going to be something special.