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Cielo Nightclub to Close After 15 Year Run

NYC‘s historic nightlife scene may be hardly recognizable in a matter of years. Following a long list of closures of New York nightclubs, including Pacha NYC and Webster Hall, historic nightclub Cielo is reportedly shutting its doors at the end of the year.

In a post to his Facebook page, DJ Dove A.K.A. Capote Barbarito alleged that the club will permanently close its doors at the end of December to make way for real estate developments. “Great memories there whether it was hanging out dancing or playing some of my best sets DJing,” he wrote. “Cielo you’ll always have a special place in my heart thank you [sic].”

Cielo opened its doors to the public in 2003. The concept for the nightclub was hatched by Nicolas Matar, a DJ who got the idea for the club from playing Pacha Ibiza’s El Cielo, also called The Funky Room. Over the past 15 years his iconic club billed a talent pool diverse enough to include David Guetta, Luciano and Sven Väth.

Thanks for the memories.

 

Red Rabbit NYC is Meatpacking’s Latest Hot Spot

Amidst a busy schedule, within a frenetic workday, under the blinking eyes of a sleepless city, the elite, the few, like Alice, whose curiosity for adventure leads them down the rabbit hole, will venture to New York City’s Meatpacking District on October 6, 2018 for the opening of the exclusive Red Rabbit Club.

The 4500 square foot luxury NY nightlife venue will, ironically, fill the space once reserved for the Gilded Lily. But Red Rabbit Club will have no need to adorn itself unnecessarily. Hampton’s entrepreneur, Richie Hosein is launching the club that he hopes will, according to him, “elevate the standards for excellence for nightlife and create exceptional experiences for [its] guests.”

What makes the Red Rabbit Club unique is its exclusivity. Red Rabbit Club will offer just 17 tables, so intimacy is inherent in this subterranean and surreal venue. While other clubs focus on numbers, Red Rabbit is all about experience. The renovation plans intend to immerse the clientele in a multi-sensate experience through progressive technology and extravagant design elements.

Red Rabbit (not to be mistaken for Dead Rabbit, an Irish bar/restaurant in lower Manhattan) is only the latest in a series of successful projects for Hosein. In the summer of 2016, he launched AM Southampton, billed as Southampton’s #1 night life experience. Among the talent it attracted was Rap singer 50 Cent, who Hosein snagged again to host the opening of Red Rabbit.

Located at 408 15th Street, New York, NY, Red Rabbit is a short hop to Chelsea Market and a skip and a jump from The Tippler, another underground bar. These, and other, new, subterranean lounges are the  answers to the lofty insurgence of rooftop bars doting the city grid. With its “rabbit hole” staircase, sunken dance floor enveloped by red plush, velvet couches and booths, surround sound, smart lighting and LED screens on the walls and ceilings, Red Rabbit portrays the motif of mystery, clandestine meetings, and the joys of becoming enraptured in the realm of fantasy.

Lewis Carroll, author of Alice in Wonderland, wrote, “But I don’t want to go among mad people,” said Alice. “Oh, you can’t help that,” said the cat. “We’re all mad here.” Perhaps the select few patrons of Red Rabbit will feel, just for a moment, as the traffic rumbles above their heads, and the lights and sounds of the happy madness envelops them, that this is an escape, a well-deserved and much needed hiatus from the norm.

Broken Shaker – NYC’s Hottest New Rooftop Bar

New Yorkers are lining up around the block to get into Broken Shaker, a new cocktail bar that sits atop the Freehand Hotel in Gramercy Park. But there, on the 18th floor, you won’t find the pricey bottle service and snobby clientele common to many hot spots.

Rather, the bar, which has outposts in Miami, Chicago and LA, has a chill, egalitarian vibe that draws an eclectic and hip crowd for its exotic cocktails.

“Everybody’s welcome and treated the same,” says co-owner Gabe Orta, 39, who runs the group of subtly tropical watering holes with buddy Elad Zvi. “We’re not changing the foundation of what Shaker is about: We want everyone to feel like they’re at home.”

With its straw-shaded light fixtures and brightly patterned wallpaper, the wood-paneled space feels like an Afro-Caribbean rec room. Funk, reggae and soul emanate from an old-school, reel-to-reel audio tape and DJs will spin on occasion. A huge outdoor space wraps around the indoor bar, offering 360-degree views of Midtown, along with plenty of out-of-the-way nooks perfect for discreet canoodling.

On a recent night, the clientele was a mix of creative types, tech guys and Instagram babes — quite a different crowd than the one that previously occupied the space.

“Apparently Joey Ramone once lived in the hotel [back when it was a fleabag called the George Washington] and Keith Haring hung out here,” says Zvi. “ The outdoor part of the bar used to be a sun deck. The indoor part was a game room.”

The first Broken Shaker launched in 2012, originally as a pop-up at the Freehand in Miami. It quickly gained a loyal following, thanks to its fresh juice-infused cocktails and mellow atmosphere. It has since expanded to other Freehand outposts — each with its own distinct feel.

For New York, head bartender Evan Hawkins, formerly of the acclaimed Mother’s Ruin, has created a number of drinks (all $16) inspired by the Big Apple. They include the tequila-based Curry in a Hurry, named for a nearby Indian spot of the same name, and the Smillie, a beet-based cordial that honors Orta and Zvi’s friend, Upland chef Justin Smillie. There’s even a bagel-based drink.

The Poppyseed Bagel Fizz is made by soaking poppy seed bagels from downtown’s Black Seed in water, sugar and yeast overnight and then mixing the resulting liquid with liquor.

“We create a kind of bagel beer and use it to make a gin fizz,” says Zvi. Expect more New York-specific drinks in the future, along with bar games such as Jenga, chess and backgammon.

“We used to visit [NYC] every month to be inspired,” says Orta. “Now, being here and actually living here, we’re finding new ways to be inspired all the time. It all ties together.”

A concise, international menu features elevated bar food from South American arepas to Middle Eastern dips.

Locals who loved the Florida original are thrilled to have a Broken Shaker of their own.

“I felt like I was traveling to Florida without having to buy an airline ticket,” says Gary Toriello, 52, a web designer from Jersey City, who praised the balanced cocktails and nice glassware. “I’ll definitely be back.”

Circle Nightclub NYC Closed – Mission Nightclub Grand Opening

All those who mourned (whether seriously or ironically) the closure of Korean nightclub Circle last weekend can take a pause: Turns out the owners of a massive new Chelsea nightclub opening next month called Mission are the same people who ran Circle.

Partner Bobby Kwak says that the real reason Circle closed was because they couldn’t afford the new lease asking price at the club, which was in an area that now has a Whole Foods and a SoulCycle. It’s working out better for them though, he says: Mission Nightclub, which opens on March 3 at 229 West 28th Street between Seventh and Eighth avenues, is slightly closer to K-Town, where many of their clientele party before and after going to the club anyway. It’s also bigger than Circle, he adds.

Mission won’t be that different from Circle. Like its predecessor, Mission will mimic clubs in Korea, with plates of cut up fruit for people who order bottle service and well-dressed men as servers instead of the cocktail waitresses more common at American clubs. A new and upgraded sound system will also be in place, as will a new lighting system. Otherwise, “a club is a club at the end of the day: lights, music, dancing, bars,” Kwak says.

Besides the superior space and the lost of the previous lease, the partners also decided to reopen a Korean nightclub elsewhere because “there’s a need for something like this,” he says. Circle had been around for a decade and was primarily a go-to club for Koreans, Korean Americans, and other Asians and Asian Americans. In an oral history about the club, website The Ringer calls it “an epicenter of Korean nightlife in New York.” It frequently sported long lines every weekend, had a location near Times Square, and was visited by celebrities like Usher, Anthony Bourdain, and Pharrell Williams — but was virtually unknown to people outside the community.

Ultimately, the new club’s — ahem — mission will be the same as Circle, too: to be a place for Asians and Asian Americans.

“The Asian community, they hate to admit it, but they loved Circle,” Kwak says. “It’s like a safe haven for them. It’s kind of like Cheers. …that’s what Circle was to the Asian community. People were regulars were there because they felt a sense of comfort. They felt a sense of home. It was a place where people in the Asian community were able to connect with each other.”

New York City / Brooklyn New Year’s Eve 2018 Party Guide

The Answer: Somewhere between 0 and 1.

The Question: What is the recommended number of times in their life a person should visit Times Square to witness the world-famous ball drop on New Year’s Eve?

Some people do happen to think that throwing themselves into one of the biggest, maddest, messiest crushes of humanity on the planet to bring in the New Year shoulder-to-shoulder with a million strangers (and millions around the world watching) is an exciting item to cross off their bucket lists.  For most of us normal human beings, ugh and no thanks – hard pass.  From the bitterly cold winter weather to the claustrophobic lack of space to the earsplitting noise to the filthy aftermath of narrow trash-strewn streets that were already pretty dirty to begin with, we believe that New Year’s Eve in New York City should be spent ANYWHERE BUT its tourist trap central artery.

For one last chance in 2017 you’ve got a tailor-made excuse to set aside all your past year’s disappointments – and trust us, Times Square on NYE would be yet another disappointment – and promise yourself that next year will be THE BEST YEAR OF YOUR LIFE, all while surrounding yourself with fun-loving strangers, pulsating music, and premium liquor as you dance all your cares away.  And there are few better cities in the world for doing this than in New York City, one the world’s preeminent entertainment destinations, with hundreds of fabulous party options to suit any taste.

Discotech can most certainly assist with you finding year-end good fortune in a great party atmosphere.  Here our Top 3 picks for the best NYE nightclub parties/events around the Big Apple for you and your friends to close out 2017 and ring in 2018:

1) Sunnery James & Ryan Marciano @ Marquee NY


Feel the New York City lights this New Year’s Eve at the chic and illustrious Marquee Nightclub, featuring the world-renowned electronic music DJs Sunnery James and Ryan Marciano.  A fixture within its sister locations of Las Vegas and Sydney, the Marquee brand continues to dominate New York nightlife and consistently attracts the city’s A-list crowd as well as celebrities, models, and moguls from all over the world.   While the tourists overrun the Times Square area for New Year’s Eve festivities, Marquee remains comfortably tucked away just outside of the fray in nearby Chelsea, and it will be where the well-heeled and influential New York professionals will ring in 2018. Make sure to buy your tickets now to join the party, as this event has sold out every year since its launch nearly a decade ago.  General Admission Includes a 4-Hour Premium Open Bar from 8:30PM-12:30AM, passed trey hors d’oeuvres, and a midnight champagne toast.

Time: 8:30 PM – 4:00 AM

Venue: Marquee NY (289 10th Ave, New York, NY 10001)

2) Dream Downtown New Year’s Eve @ pHD Downtown

Located inside the Dream Hotel,  the aptly named pHD has long been a favorite weekday haunt for the city’s large global graduate student community and the even larger community of recent graduates that flock to NYC endlessly to take on new jobs every year.  Whether you’re still in school or have been out for some time, you’re about to earn your advanced degree in partying it up at this haute rooftop nightclub and lounge bar. Decked out in Italian Portoro marble, Macassar ebony, nickel finish walls, and amber Venini glass chandeliers, pHD is a memorable ambiance for putting on the ultimate penthouse party, and it will be rocking into 2018.  Swing, sway and swerve with locals to the on-point beats of guest DJs, and pop out to the landscaped terrace from time to time for one of the city’s most spectacular uninterrupted sightline views of the Hudson River and Empire State Building.  General Admission Includes a 4-Hour Premium Open Bar from 8:30PM-12:30AM, passed trey hors d’oeuvres, a live feed of the Times Square New Year’s Eve Ball Drop, a champagne toast at midnight, and festive NYE party favors.

Time: 8:30 PM – 4:00 AM

Venue: pHD Downtown @ Dream Hotel (355 West 16th Street, New York, NY 10011)

3) Gilded Lily New Year’s Eve @ Gilded Lily

From the speakeasies of the Roaring ’20s to the Studio 54 disco set of the ’70s and ’80s, NYC has been a backdrop for the “The Golden Age” of partying.  In 2018, this legacy continues – quite literally – at Gilded Lily, a renowned lavish ultra-club that begins its fourth year as a go-to hotspot in the Meatpacking District.  As you descend down the staircase (or freight elevator if you’re a VIP), you notice that the gold-dusted club is shaped like a pizza peel: the narrow entry and bar area feeds into a sunken dance floor surrounded by concentric rings of banquettes. Plush bottle service couches reign beneath a giant chandelier blinking with digitalized rainbows.  For New Year’s Eve, seasoned local promotions crew Dream Hospitality Group bucks the gilded tradition of their chosen host venue to throw a relatively moderately priced shindig with a friendly house party feel.  Of course, if you still want to be rather excessive, you’re more than welcome to do so: a $5,000 min spend will get you the best table in the house and 10 bottles for 20 friends, as well as the all-important title of the “Gilded King” with a jewel-encrusted crown and scepter to begin your your iron-fisted rule over 2018.  Dilly dilly!

Time: 9:00 PM – 4:00 AM

Venue: Gilded Lily (408 West 15th Street, New York, NY 10011)

Honorable Mention:

David Guetta @ Depot 52 Warehouse

Time: 9:00 PM – 4:00 AM

Venue: Depot 52 (7 52nd St, Brooklyn, NY 11232)

NYE 2018 @ Electric Room

Time: 8:30 PM – 4:00 AM

Venue: Electric Room @ Dream Hotel (355 West 16th Street, New York, NY 10011)

Oliver Heldens NYE 2018 @ Schimanski

Time: 10:00 PM – 5:00 AM

Venue: Schimanski (54 N 11th St, Brooklyn, NY 11249)

New Year’s Eve Party @ The Attic Rooftop

Time: 9:00 PM – 3:00 AM

Venue: The Attic Rooftop (251 West 48th Street, New York, NY 10036)

More events and more venues for New Year’s Eve 2018 in New York City can be found on the Discotech app.  Have a safe night out with your friends, please don’t drink and drive, and HAPPY NEW YEAR!!!!

New York City Halloween 2017 Guide

Ah, Halloween – a legendary weekend of dark, twisted, debauchery in The Big Pumpk- ahem, Apple.  You’ve spent months browsing Amazon for – or DIY-ing – your costume, not to mention weeks planning your excuse to get out of work.   The Days of The Dead are now upon us, and it’s time to stuff all that big-city adulting nonsense into a Jack-O-Lantern for one night and join the freaks, ghouls, and goblins haunting the town.

Step 1: Insert knife and carve circle.  Step 2: Pull off top.  Step 3: Insert first-world problems.

Only one problem remains: where to drag your tired, decked-out, makeup-caked zombie corpse for some brains (and by brains I mean alcohol).  In true New York City fashion, you waited until the last second to decide, didn’t you????  Well, save your fears for the unknown (and undead!), because we’ve got the knowledge – and the plug – on this year’s hottest haunt spots in NYC.    Here we highlight the biggest monsters in the bunch.

Friday, October 27th

Bloody Friday Halloween @ Cielo

South Bronx native Les Carbonell kicks off Halloween weekend by getting scary on the turntables with a mixture of deep soulful beats, melodious vocals, and quality Techno.  There will be blood (again) in the Meatpacking District… mixed with plenty of sweat on the dance floor.

Time: 10:00 PM – 4:00 AM

Venue: Cielo (18 Little West 12th Street, New York, NY 10014)

Saturday, October 28th

Nightmare on Ludlow @ The DL

This Halloween, bask in eerie thrills and party like there’s no tomorrow with the beautiful creatures of NYC at The DL’s Halloween bash. A live DJ will spin smoldering hits of Top 40, Hip Hop, House and Mash Ups as the naughty nurses and scary vampires wreak havoc on the dance floor. For the party fiends with even more sinful tastes, VIP Table and Bottle Packages will satiate your thirst for the VIP experience with amenities like expedited admission, full service in a private space, and bottle presentations. 

Time: 5:30 PM – 4:00 AM

Venue: The DL (95 Delancy Street, New York, NY 10002)

SoldOut Saturdays Golden Goblin Edition @ Gilded Lily

One of the more unique and exclusive hotspots in the Meatpacking District, the Gilded Lily has become a favorite haunt for celebrities and NYC socialites.  On this night, the Lily will be transformed into a dark haunt for ghouls, ghosts, and the elusive Golden Goblin.  Costumes are a must, and don’t be surprised if you find a few famous faces behind those masks.

Time: 10:00 PM – 4:00 AM

Venue: Gilded Lily (408 West 15th Street, New York, NY 10011)

Nightmare on 14th Street @ Up & Down

Just like on a normal weeknight at U&D, it will be quite the nightmare to get into this exclusive party – tickets sold out in less than a week.  Your only way in will be to book a VIP table, dress like Freddy Krueger, or be a group of attractive females that look like Freddy’s next victims.

Time: 10:00 PM – 4:00 AM

Venue: Up & Down (408 West 15th Street, New York, NY 10011)

Sunday, October 29

Showtime Sundays Halloween Party @ LAVO

As if Sunday Funday wasn’t turnt up enough in The City That Never Sleeps, Sunday Scream Day will be rocking on a whole new level on the dark isle of Manhattan.   LAVO is the perennial “Place To Be Seen” on Sunday nights, with a healthy clientele mix of fashion models, Wall Street bros, and the “no school tomorrow” fashion students and grad school kids that aspire to be both.  Trick-or-treating isn’t cheap here – VIP tables are the only way in.

Time: 11:00 PM – 4:00 AM

Venue: LAVO NY (39 E 58th St, New York, NY 10022)

Tuesday, October 31st

OAK Halloween Party @ 1OAK

Is there any greater “Fear Factor” than standing outside one of NYC’s most exclusive and best-branded clubs in the freezing cold, blood curdling, hoping that the bouncer will let you in?  Well, for one evening you can put your recurring nightmare on hold: the world-famous 1 OAK Nightclub, headlined by New York native Jus Ske, takes an angelic break from its usual devilish tight door policy/”VIP Tables Only” standard to allow costume-wearing revelers purchasing pre-sale tickets (limited supply $20/$30) past its hallowed doors and into its supernatural playground.   Paranormal activity, indeed!

Time: 11:00 PM – 4:00 AM

Venue: 1 OAK NYC (453 W 17th St, New York, NY 10011)

More events and more venues for Halloween Week in NYC – including non-costume parties – can be found in our app at https://app.discotech.me/new-york/events.    Happy haunting!

New York Looks To Appoint “Night Mayor” to Regulate Nightlife and Warehouse Parties

Following on the footsteps of cities the likes of Amsterdam, Paris and London, NYC is now looking toward appointing a Night Mayor to overlook the metropolis’ nightlife.

New York City Councilman Rafael Espinal began putting together a proposal for legislation that calls for an entire section of local government to protect and manage the nightlife industry.  According to Espinal’s plan the Office Of Nightlife would oversee the regulation of the city’s DIY art and warehouse spaces, and would be the liaison point between City Hall and New York’s bustling $10 billion nightlife economy.

The Office of Nightlife would be overseen by a Night Mayor, in a very similar manner to metropolises in Europe such as Zurich, Amsterdam, Paris and London. With the recent attention on safety and licensing regulation, the city has suffered a loss with regards to the DIY art community. The Night Mayor would come in to oversee, preserve and protect the DIY scene and other smaller-scale venues.

H/T: Gothamist

Best Clubs Without Bottle Service

You may have been there: It’s late, and you’re at a club. The pounding music has started to make you question the merits of “celebrity” DJs. (Celebrities to whom?) The sweaty men and loud women crowding you are so far gone they think everyone is as excited as they are about the bottle of champagne they just spent $1,200 on. Look, it even has a sparkler in it!

Suddenly, instead of having fun, you think to yourself: Is it over yet? When can I just go home?

Good news: You’re not the only one.

“People are getting weary,” said Ronnie Madra, a co-partner with Richie Akiva at Butter Group, which owns 1Oak, Up & Down and NeverNever. “People are tired of the branding and the websites and the marketing and the minimums. Some still relish it, but as the world is changing, the landscape of nightlife is going to go with it.”

“The modern form of bottle service first started in certain clubs in the late ‘90s-early 2000s, and then things fully swung that way,” said Angelo Bianchi, the creative director of the Blond, a private club in New York. Bianchi made his name in New York nightlife as the doorman for the famously cool Beatrice Inn and Jane Hotel. “That was the reason for the success of the smaller clubs in 2006, and they were the anti to that bottles-and-models system. At Beatrice, we never sold one bottle. It was a point of pride.”

That’s why Bianchi partnered with co-creative director (and Beatrice and Le Baron alum) Julio Montero to create the Blond at Aby Rosen’s 11 Howard hotel (more on that below), and it’s why Madra and co-creators Ronnie Flynn and Deevee Kashi started NeverNever, the tiny, dark dancing space next to Up & Down that has a much tighter door policy than its siblings. At NeverNever, the crowd looks cool, artistic, international and well-dressed. Most important, they don’t all look the same. There is no obligatory bottle service.

Madra said NeverNever happened “as a necessity” to cater to a younger crowd turned off by commercial club glitz, who were venturing to Brooklyn and even Long Island to party. While it takes generally $5 million or so to open a new club, Madra spent $30,000 to open NeverNever—and made that money back before the end of the first week.

“We built it as a little place where we are not going to get rich over night, but you can make a little profit and you can bring in a goulash of personalities and social standing,” he said. “There’s no sign on the door; you can’t really Google it. That’s what we like.”

In fact, plenty of places work as the outside of the model-promoter system. They’re quieter and more hidden, but the great thing is that the amount of fun you have is usually in direct proportion to just how quiet and how hidden they are—and how discerning the guy at the door is.

“People are interested in having an authentic experience where they are not walking into a situation that feels one certain way,” Bianchi said. “They’ll know within the first few minutes of walking in whether they’ll come back. People don’t want to go to places that feel like clubland, they want something organic. They want to go to somewhere on a quiet street.”

We’ve compiled a list of the top global nightclubs without bottle service. Enjoy!

Berghain, Berlin

This is another world-renowned institution, and while it’s no chic lounge, at least it doesn’t have models and bottles. The former power plant is so notorious that GQ profiled its famous doorman, and fashion heavies frequent it on their German excursions. There’s no rule at the door, other than the fact that you probably can’t get in. You definitely won’t get in if you’re wearing a suit, high heels, or any bright colors. Music here is heavily skewed to techno and house; phones and cameras are prohibited. There are no mirrors in the bathrooms. There is no VIP area. Don’t even think about trying to buy your way in. Expect to see an older crowd, well-cultured in dark, aggressive, club-going leather, possible fetishes, and heavy tattoos.

Where: Am Wriezener Bahnhof

When to go: Don’t get there before 4 a.m.

Pikes Hotel, Ibiza

Set aside your preconceived notions about Ibiza being chock full of EDM clubs stuffed with young Brits on Ketamine. That’s about a two-street strip; the rest of the desert island is beautiful, spare, and subtle in its pleasures. Pike’s Hotel, which is formally called the Ibiza Rocks House and is hidden in the rocky hills above Ibiza town, is one of those jewels. The place is built in a 15th century stone mansion that was converted to a hotel in 1978; the lounge and music area famously hosted jet setters, bohemians, musicians, and artists in decadence for years. (It provided the set to Wham’sClub Tropicana video of the 1980s.) The space plays lots of rock ‘n’ roll and funk/disco, plus famous old school DJs most nights; costumes and props are in some rooms, if you become inclined.

Where: Camí Sa Vorera, San Antonio

When to go: Not before 2 a.m.

Raspoutine, Paris

The Blond held its Paris Fashion Week party here, which is saying something about the level of its status as an international A-List spot. Bianchi said it’s his favorite place to relax out when he’s in France. The general design of the room hasn’t changed for decades, with Byzantine red velvet and pink neon trim on the seats and walls; this is a testament to the brilliance of what used to be a bordello. The top of French creative life files through here at some point or another: high-powered fashion photographers, owners of other clubs, financiers, designers, editors, singers, painters—and, yes, Russian money—from all ages and races. Handsome, well-known-among-a-certain-set DJs imported from all over the world perform until early in the morning hours.

Where: 58 Rue de Bassano

When to go: The most fun you’ll have is a late night here during fashion week—odds are you’ll encounter the most beautiful women you’ve ever seen. (I did). Show up after the early birds finish their dinners and cabaret dances. The real crowd you want to see gets here after 1 a.m.

The Scotch of St. James, London

It’s a veritable bastion of music history: The Beatles and Rolling Stones performed live sets here, but it’s no concert venue. The owners of Paris and New York nightclub Le Baron had a hand in its rejuvenation, and now it’s updated to reflect a modern outlook; fashion types (Stella McCartney, Kate Moss, Cara Delevingne) hold parties there on special nights. So do New York nightlife gurus out for work abroad. If you go, drink Scotch whisky or bourbon—they’ll go well with the Denim Jeans and disco.

Where: Mason’s Yard.

When to go: Show up around midnight on a Wednesday or Thursday. You’ll be good.

Doheny Room, Los Angeles

The spot on Santa Monica Boulevard has a warm, airy California feel and a potentially softer hand for people who want to get inside. The walls are lined in banana palms and portraits of David Bowie and Faye Dunaway; in true LA style, the menu has lobster and vegan sushi. Upstairs offers more of a club atmosphere—you can buy a table if you want, and you will see a DJ and maybe even bottle service, though not at the level of annoyance. For LA, that’s saying a lot.

Where: 9077 Santa Monica Blvd.

When to go: Go to dinner at 9 p.m.; upstairs will have energy around 11 p.m.

Paul’s Cocktail Lounge, New York

Colloquially known as Paul’s Baby Grand (but officially named Paul’s Cocktail Lounge, so as to avoid confusion with Baby’s All Right and Baby Grand, two other NYC late night places), this is the little room Paul Sevigny created under the auspices of the Roxy (formerly Tribeca Grand) Hotel. The walls are covered in large palms (wallpapered and otherwise); the male wait staff wear white, double-breasted suits and carry themselves with the dignity of those who have partied in the glam bygone days of another era. Open format is the key here. You’ll hear dance tunes from Madonna to Scissor Sisters here; don’t expect Calvin Harris or Drake. Ludwig, the doorman, is fickle and wise; if he turns you away a time or two, he may welcome you with open arms on the third try.

Where: 2 Sixth Ave.

When to go: Go at midnight or 1 a.m. It’s closed on Sundays and Mondays.

The Oasis Clubhouse, Buenos Aires

The private members-only club is just that—unless you know someone, or want to purchase a guest pass for the entire place. While the rest of the club has a lounge, terrace, bars, a pool and gardens, weekends are the draw if you want to drink and dance: There’s usually a DJ and plenty of internationally minded sophisticates to talk to while you’re there. The feeling here is relaxed and faintly Parisian, with a twist. The place feels like a hidden Argentine villa decorated with American and European expats. (It very nearly is.) You won’t work up a sweat dancing, but you will feel extremely self-satisfied at how well you’ve managed to infiltrate the cool-people crowd. And the cocktail list is extremely well put.

Where: Costa Rica 4651 Palermo Soho C1414

When to go: On the early side of the evening, for a cocktail and respite.

Mr Fongs, New York

The brainchild of five owning partners, including Adam Moonves (yes, the son of that Moonves), Fong’s lacks signage and glitter, which is exactly why you venture down under the Manhattan Bridge deep in Chinatown, anyway. The feel here is softer, with Brooklyn creatives of all ages mixing with Manhattan artists and publicists. The DJ in the corner is almost an afterthought (there is a jukebox), but he’s there to move the crowd a bit once the night gets on.

Where: 40 Market St.

When to go: Sometime around midnight should be fine. Avoid the weekends.

NeverNever, New York

This is the secret club on the backside of Up & Down. A short, dark hallway connects the two, but a big man in a dark suit is positioned there, and you won’t be able to get from one to the other. NeverNever is more exclusive—and more secretive—than Up & Down; Benny, the doorman out front, seems erratic, but he’s sharp as a razor’s edge about whom he lets in. If you do make it past Benny, expect to see a lot of Australian surfer studs slightly disheveled in the way that charms American girls, their off-duty model girlfriends, writers, chefs, and lots of doormen/DJs/managers from other clubs who come in late to network and gossip. You’ll hear a lot of new wave and indie music here; you won’t hear hip-hop. As Madra said: “It’s not about the big experience, it’s about the right experience.”

Where: 246 W. 14th St.

When to go: No earlier than 1 a.m., weeknights. Two a.m. is better.

Paradise by Way of Kensal Green, London

The place has a menu filled with seasonal delectables and gastro pub fare, but the late-night drinks and music scene is what we’re after here. Inside are multiple levels with dark corners for chatting or eyeing the famous Sunday Roast. It’s located close to Queen’s Park and Kensal Green stations in West London, so the music (DJs, R&B, Jazz, Electronic) is as eclectic as its patrons (youngish, casually pretty) and wine list.

Where: 19 Kilburn Lane

When to go: Go for an early at 10 p.m. before heading elsewhere for the night.

Rose Bar, New York

This is the gold standard for grand New York lounge-y bars where you can hear a DJ and dance a little, or cuddle in a comfortable banquette and watch people while you sip a boulevardier under a large Damien Hirst. It’s in the Gramercy Park Hotel, so the crowd is mixed, with moneyed Internationals, uptown twentysomethings, and on certain nights, music lovers who come to hear Chairlift or CRX play secret sets. (Credit Matthew E. Green and his staff with directing a robust indie scene there.) Go on Wednesday to hear Johnsville DJ; his knowledge of dark and sexy tracks (Donna Summer, Larry Levan, Poolside) beats anything you’ll hear elsewhere.

Where: 2 Lexington Ave.

When to go: 11 p.m. or later, but before 2 a.m.

No Name, Los Angeles

Los Angeles has cornered the market on showy places with sparklers and ladies with faux appendages (hair, breasts, lips, and so forth) so to find a place truly away from big film spenders and swimsuit models on the make takes some work. Enter No Name, the unmarked spot on Fairfax that works hard to avoid those patrons. It’s unlisted, so the only way you’ll get in is through word of mouth or a quasi-secret invite system that feeds into a list as inflexible as a sidewalk. Once inside, you can order food, if you want, or gawk at the art and actors that line the walls. Listen to the DJ play Edward Sharpe; maybe drink an Old Fashioned.

Where: 423 N. Fairfax Ave.

When to go: Early, by New York standards. The place clears out by 2 a.m.

Silencio, Paris

The scent inside Silencio is subtle, intoxicating, and unforgettable, just like the weird Club Silencio that inspired it, from Mulholland Drive. You don’t really notice it at all until you’re all the way down the winding stairs to the bottom, where cavernous rooms include one for smoking, several for lounging, and a chic dance floor right in the front of the DJ booth. The bar in the center is expensive and extensive. Be ready: The fashionable crowd in front of the DJ will dance, if given the chance.

Where: 142 Rue Montmartre

When to go: If you have the chance to go, go, and the earlier in the morning (2 a.m. or so) the better. This is one of the world’s best clubs in the real sense of the word: hidden, chic, with an interesting mix of all types of creative, beautiful, stylish, and odd people. The whole thing is an experience without seeming constructed or artificial. What you won’t find inside: suits, Louboutines, body-con dresses. What you will find inside: Rick Owens, Yoji Yamamoto, Celine, Saint Laurent, obscure fashion brands from Spain, France, New York, California.

The Blonde, New York

This might be the hardest door to get into in New York at the moment; once inside—if you get inside—you’ll find the sort of interesting mix that the models/bottles formula scattered: tall, pretty, and fashionable women who happen to work as models, sure, but also young street artists, understated rich kids from Paris, a British photographer or two, and a couple of New York local downtown kids—gay, old-school club kids, too—mixed in for good measure. Even though the space is part of the Howard Hotel, it’s never open to the public, and doorman Dereck is famously standoffish, so don’t expect to get in easily. The vibe is chic, dark, intimate and faintly European; expect to hear everything from Talking Heads and Fleetwood Mac to Rihanna and 2 Chainz.

“When you walk into the Blond, we didn’t want to make it feel like a club,” said Anis Khoury, general manager of the 11 Howard hotel. “Plush, comfortable—that word comfortable just keeps coming up. The Blond exemplifies what a comfortable setting should be, a place where you go to meet friends of friends.”

Where: 11 Howard St.

When to go: Late, after midnight, on Tuesday, Wednesday, or Friday.

Pacha NYC Closing After A Decade

Pacha New York has announced that it will be closing its doors in 2016. After a decade of unforgettable nights the club is calling it quits, but not before they go out with a bang.

Known for 24-hour non-stop parties, Pacha is undoubtedly one of the main fixtures on the American club circuit, with its 10 years apparently including 10,000 hours of music, six million clubbers through its doors and two million bottles of alcohol being sold.

It’s celebrating its 10-year anniversary throughout December, followed by a huge New Year’s Eve event and, finally, a series of closing parties will follow in January 2016.

Pacha NYC president, Eddie Dean, issued a statement: “The average nightclub lasts 18 months – we lasted 120. It’s been a wild ride that none of us will ever forget. Our final parties will celebrate the different artists, styles, and scenes that have made Pacha great.”

This news is particularly sad due to last summer’s sudden passing of Rob Fernandez, who was both the Director of Promotions and Bookings at Pacha NYC, as well as an NYC promoter kingpin.

The anniversary parties will include appearances from Pacha’s founding resident DJ Erick Morillo, as well as Dirty South, Markus Schulz and more. NYE is yet to be announced but promises a 72-hour marathon to enter 2016 in style.