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Best EDM Clubs in Chicago

For the most part, luxury night clubs play a mix of hip hop music with EDM (electronic dance music). EDM clubs in Chicago tend to draw a crowd of fun, lively people that love to get down on the dance floor. Your experience, however, depends on your budget and preference of venue. Come find shelter from the weather of the Windy City at one of the fun-filled clubs below. Use the Discotech app or website to see who’s playing, book table service, and buy tickets to all of the clubs below.

Currently, River North is the main area of the city that houses most EDM clubs.

PRYSM

prysm chicago dance floor

PRYSM boasts big names like Afrojack and DJ Khaled, but larger events tend to fill up quickly, so be sure to get there early! Be sure to check see upcoming DJs at Prysm on the Discotech app.

Underground

underground chicago

The app will also let you track events at Underground, another popular EDM club in the area that celebrities and high-profile DJs frequent, if that’s the vibe you’re into for the night.

Sound Bar

For those of you opting for variety, you’ll want to head over to Sound Bar, which plays everything from Top 40 to EDM to hip hop, depending on what area of the club you find yourself at. Equipped with two levels, four boutique lounges, nine bars, and an exclusive VIP room, you’ll have no difficulty finding a scene you enjoy using the Discotech app.

Smartbar

Originally housed on the fourth floor of the magnificent Wrigleyville building (also home to Metro), this venerated dance club is now in the basement. A makeover in 2006 slicked up the looks a notch and brought back a vibrant young crowd. But more importantly, Smartbar boasts a world-class Funktion One sound system, which sounds tremendous on the central dance floor. Typical bills find cutting-edge DJs from Europe, Detroit and Chicago spinning for the crowd. You’ll typically find more underground DJs here. Think techno, deep house, drum & bass, etc. Tickets available on the Discotech app.

If you want to keep updated on the new DJs in town, be sure to download the Discotech app, which provides you with a constantly updated list of events happening in your area, no matter your price range or music preference. This guide to nightlife in Chicago is also a good starting point if you’re not sure what direction you want to take. If you’d like to learn more about our services or need assistance with anything, whether you’re new to the area or a local, feel free to hit our help line.

Chicago’s The Mid Closing in Early 2019

Popular Chicago music venue the MID has announced that it will be closing its doors for good on February 5, 2019.

The sleek nightlife hotspot has attributed their closure to recent expansion of the city’s West Loop neighborhood and Fulton Market District.

Opening its doors in 2010, the MID has hosted a range of noteworthy artists such as Adam Beyer, Derrick Carter, Green Velvet, Laurent Garnier, Skrillex, Deep Dish, Diplo Claude Von Stroke, and more.

In the months leading up to its closure, the venue plans on announcing a number of special “farewell parties” to give the location a proper send-off. Club owners Lucas King and Nick Karounos admit that they are sad to say farewell to their endeared nightclub but look forward to opening new venues in Chicago very soon.

“These last remaining months will be a celebration of the past and a toast to the future,” says club owner Lucas King. “We want to thank all the fans, artists, employees, agents, managers, and promoters who have supported us throughout this era. As a token of our appreciation, we are putting together some very special events leading up to that “One Last Song.”

Tao Chicago Grand Opening September 2018

“Everyone has a story about that space.”

That’s how Paul Goldstein summarizes people’s reactions to his mention of the iconic, 126-year-old building that sits on the corner of Dearborn and Ontario, which has previously housed trendy (and not so trendy) nightclubs, from Castle to Excalibur.

Goldstein is a partner of Tao Group, the uber-successful clubstaurant company that is gearing up to open an extravagant destination in the granite-clad structure. Given that a certain generation of Chicagoans engaged in much debauchery there, the property is a fitting home for this new venture.

The group likes to fill vacant but storied buildings with new life (Tao Uptown in New York, for one, is in a former movie theater that was originally built as stables for the Vanderbilt family). The Chicago property, landmarked in 1997, exemplifies this affinity. Tao has restored the entire building, embarking on an extensive gut rehab. Workers have removed most of the interior floors to create a dramatic 34,000-square-foot restaurant and nightclub with soaring ceilings, akin to Tao Group’s other glamorous venues in New York, Las Vegas, and Los Angeles.

Filled with Asian art and antiques, the new Tao Chicago will be a hopping, see-and-be-seen spot. Its chefs will prepare dishes representing a variety of East Asian and Southeast Asian cuisines, including Chinese, Japanese, and Thai (don’t use the word “fusion” to describe this; executive chef Mike Armstrong hates it). The menu will incorporate favorites from other Tao locations: the decadent tuna Pringle, for instance, a chip-shaped wonton draped with thinly sliced premium tuna, heirloom tomato, and truffle, is coming over from LA. But it will also feature new dishes unique to Chicago, like a kampachi sashimi served with fried olives, pea shoots, and a hajikami vinaigrette. Tao Chicago will also offer an expanded selection of steaks because, as Goldstein puts it, “the clientele here is more meat-focused.”

Tao Chicago is preparing to open in late September. A tip: if you venture in early, you’ll be rewarded with 20 percent off everything for the first two weeks.

Only time will tell if Chicago will embrace this massive clubstaurant, but Tao Group is doing its best to make the space feel like a genuine part of this city. Its partners have spent months eating at local restaurants, observing what works here (approachable but impeccable service, complicated and challenging food) and what doesn’t (anything that seems too exclusive).

As a result, Chicago will have a slightly different feel than Tao’s New York and LA locations. As Goldstein says, “LA and New York are sometimes more ‘velvet rope,’ more difficult to get in, but we think in Chicago, it’s important to be inclusive, to be part of things. There are no VIP rooms, there is no behind the curtains.”

It’s hard to imagine that getting a reservation at Tao will be easy, but at least you probably won’t have to bribe the bouncer to make it inside.